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HANGMAN CREEK WATERSHED

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Hangman Creek Groundwater Monitoring Project

In 2010 the SCD began a hydrogeolic study in the Hangman Creek watershed with the goal of providing planners and community members with information about the aquifers and recharge characteristics to better enable them to make informed decisions about future groundwater development.

The project consisted of drilling and testing six monitoring wells throughout the Hangman Creek watershed and developing a hydrogeolic conceptual model using geologic, hydraulic and geochemical data collected during the testing. The conceptual model also incorporated existing data from the Department of Ecology’s well log database and seepage and surface water data from the SCD.

Monitoring wells were installed to measure long-term groundwater levels. The wells will provide data to evaluate long-term groundwater trends at key locations in the watershed. This information will allow the local community to better understand its groundwater resources with an emphasis on protecting this resource for water supply and local creek flows.

The installation of the wells is scheduled to be completed by June 2011, and they will continue to be monitored on a long-term basis. For more information on this project, please contact Rick Noll.

Hangman Creek Stream Bank Stabilization Project

The SCD is undergoing a project to stabilize the right bank of Hangman Creek immediately downstream of the Valley Chapel Road Bridge. The project is designed to maintain the stream meander and restore the proper cross-section geometry through the project reach.

The project length is approximately 1,600’ of stream bank. Currently the proposed site is a vertical-to-near vertical bank, approximately eight to 12’ high with little shade and/or vegetation. The project will reshape the stream bank to a lower slope where native vegetation can be planted. The goals of this project are to restore vegetation, reduce erosion, and improve fish and aquatic habitat, water quality and aesthetics.

The project will restore the channel cross-section geometry through the site reach and make a new floodplain on the right side similar to the existing floodplain. The existing cobble bar will be modified to provide a channel cross-section consistent with the existing upstream and downstream channel configurations and the vertical banks will be sloped back for vegetation plantings. Soil from the bank shaping will be used in fabric-encased soil lifts to construct the right floodplain to the proper elevation.

The project began in 2009 and is scheduled to be complete by December 2011. For more information on this project, please contact Rick Noll.

Town of Rockford Reservoir & Riparian Improvements

The Town of Rockford needed to replace its aging and inadequate reservoir. With the help of a local engineering consultant and the WRIA 56 Implementation Committee, they successfully submitted a grant application to the Department of Ecology and received more than $800,000.

Rockford wants to replace their existing 110,000 gallon reservoir with a 200,000 gallon reservoir as well as repairing riparian habitat along several sections of Rock Creek in town. A condition of the grant was that they had to participate in a stream bank restoration and habitat enhancement project. The riparian project will improve the riparian function, increase wildlife habitat and stabilize stream bank erosion on a section of Rock Creek.

In April 2008 the SCD installed a riparian planting of over 3,000 plants of varying sizes on the right bank, including an irrigation system. The project treated approximately 350’ of eroded stream bank, stemming from channel changes induced by cobble bar formation in the aftermath of the 1996-1997 high flows and flooding. The eroded bank and adjacent uplands had been grazed and no significant riparian plant community was established. The treatment consisted of a biotechnical bank rehabilitation using three fabric-encased soil lifts on an armored toe. The entire first, second, and most of the third, soil lifts are faced with 12-18’’ diameter coir logs. Species including red osier dogwood were placed in wet soil matrices between the lifts as each one was constructed. Native sedges found on the upstream portion of the site were salvaged and replanted at the face of the armored toe and first fabric-encased lift.

The majority of the right bank bar, which has also been extensively grazed for a long period of time, was excavated for the left bank rehabilitation. Various weeds dominated this area, while the undisturbed right bank area was thoroughly plated with species like ponderosa pine, aspen and Woods’ rose, and supplied with a temporary irrigation system.

The Rockford community has embraced the project and has raised more than $11,000 of matching funds. Town officials hope to receive continued support from its citizens, businesses, and private landowners along the creek. Since the project began it has been subjected to high flows and ice debris. Some damage resulting from ice chunks has been sustained but has been repaired by SCD staff. Monitoring and planting efforts will continue on the site.

For more information on this project, please contact Charlie Peterson.

Hangman
Creek Watershed Leak Detection Program

A Water System Leak Detection Program was initiated by the WRIA 56 Watershed Implementation Team in the fall of 2010. The program was designed to provide leak survey and repair services to several small towns and utilities in an effort to conserve water use in their distribution systems. These watershed systems have 1,343 connections and a combined annual water use of 794.4 mg (2004 MPS report). 

Unaccounted water use can be a major challenge in small towns due to costs of locating leaks and completing repairs.  Unaccounted water use was adequate for three of them, moderate for two, and high to very high for two systems. Total unaccounted water use for these systems in 2004 was approximately 13% of annual water use or 103.74 mg (2004 MPS report).

Water System

# Connections

Unaccounted Water Use

Fairfield

256

(10%) - Ok

Latah

88

(27%) - High

Rockford

225

(<25%) - Moderate

Spangle

141

(39%) Very High

Tekoa

375

(<25%) - Moderate

Waverly

55

(5%) - Good

Hangman Hills Water District

203

*Unknown

Notes:
*No information was collected on Hangman Hills Water District prior to this work.
MSP report ref


The Spokane Conservation District contracted with American Leak Detection Services to conduct the leak survey work.  In addition to the surveys, American Leak Detection coordinated and held a leak detection workshop for all the small towns in the Hangman Creek Watershed and also invited the neighboring towns as well.  The workshop was well attended.  The small towns coordinated and scheduled dates with the consultant to conduct the surveys.

Field technicians conducted leak surveys in February through April 2011. Standard microphone equipment was utilized to test all AC, CI, metal, C900, ductile and PVC lines. Technicians checked all meters, hydrants and valves. If probable leak noises were detected and noted, then these areas were re-tested to determine if real leaks existed. A FCS Tricor Correlator was utilized to better locate leaks where necessary.

Leak survey work on seven small towns and utilities yielded nine leaks (see table below). The majority of the leaks were found to be on private residences (four). Two leaks were located on main lines, one hose bib, one hydrant, and one well-head. Although the survey found many possible leak noises at each town, further investigation revealed few actual leaks.  

Other interesting information about the water systems was exposed during the surveys. The Town of Rockford has 25 meters that are broken or unreadable.  Several sites do not have meters and are relying on residential meter reading practices.   In Latah, the survey work helped locate 14 gate valves that were previously unknown.  In Tekoa, some of the valves are located underneath asphalt and will need to be dug out and located in case the particular line needs to be shut-off in the future.

For more information on this project, please contact Walt Edelen.


Water System

# Areas Surveyed

# Leaks

Type(s) of Leak

System Rating

Fairfield

63

1

Residence

Very Good

Latah

32

1

Main line

Very Good

Rockford

67

1

Hydrant

Fair

Spangle

57

0

 

Very Good

Tekoa

76

2

Residence, main line

Good

Waverly

40

0

 

Very Good

*Hangman Hills Water District

54

4

Well head, hose bib, 2 residences

Good

Notes:
*No information was collected on Hangman Hills Water District prior to this work


 

Copyright 2011 Spokane Conservation District
509.535.7274 :: info@sccd.org